EthiopianAirplane

What’s Lost in the Time Zone

in World by

When a plane falls out of the sky,
we ground ourselves.

Wear rubber boots out into the muck,
dragging a stick like a child.

For no reason whatsoever except
to groove the earth,

cut a line
between yesterday and today.

If
you cross it, will you feel

the lift of leaving
gravity? The gravity of yesterday

waiting on tomorrow or the next day.
As if

all the answers hover in the future.
When we fly across time zones,

we lose hours, sometimes days.
Where do they go?

And if
you found them dusting a mountain range

like snow, floating on the ocean
or scattered like ashes on a desert,

what would you do with each recovered
hour? Each rescued day?

 


READ MORE

Grieving families given earth from Ethiopian crash site [U.S. News and World Report]
Investigators have reportedly found more evidence that could connect the Ethiopian Boeing 737 Max crash to a deadly accident five months before [Business Insider]


Heidi Seaborn is the author of the award-winning debut book of poetry Give a Girl Chaos {see what she can do} (C&R Press/Mastodon Books, March 2019), Poetry Editor for The Adroit Journal and a New York University MFA candidate. Since Heidi started writing in 2016, she’s won or been shortlisted for nearly two dozen awards including the International Rita Dove Award in Poetry and published in numerous journals and anthologies including The Missouri Review, Mississippi Review, Penn Review and Nimrod, a chapbook and a political pamphlet. She graduated from Stanford University and is on the board of Tupelo Press.